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Welcome back to Behind the Shot, where I choose one of my favourite photos and ramble on about how it came to exist. Enjoy! Halfway through my last trip to Kruger National Park, the worst happened. After a week of incredible sunrises and sunsets - that famous African golden hour we know and love - the weather changed, leaving me with gloom and drizzle for the rest of my trip.  For 5 days I woke up in the morning hoping for clear skies. They weren’t. Every afternoon I went out for a drive hoping the day would end in a...

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This story first appeared in my email newsletter. If you enjoy it, please make sure to sign up so you don’t miss out on more like this! I know what you’re thinking but no, “The Heron & The Hippo” isn’t the name of some fancy bistro pub. It’s the title of a little story from Kruger I want to tell you about. Make yourself a hot drink and settle in – I’m in the mood to ramble on a bit. One afternoon at the start of the trip, I spotted a heron surfing on the back of a hippo. It...

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Welcome to a new section of my blog called Behind the Shot, where I choose one of my favourite photos and ramble on about how it came to exist. Enjoy! Check out this furry little T-Rex! Okay, it’s actually a Dwarf Mongoose that I had the pleasure of meeting in Kruger National Park, South Africa. They stand on their back legs like this to check for any nearby danger (and it’s adorable). After a rather uneventful morning drive, I decided to head back out during the middle of the day to get to know the area a bit better. I...

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Here’s a quick little tip for taking better wildlife photos: get low to the ground. By getting lower to the ground, you increase the separation between the foreground and the background of the image. This will give you much more definition and impact in your images! If you shoot from above, the background of your photo is very close to the subject. This means that your background is going to be much more in focus than if it was further away. Time for an example? I think so. Here’s a shot of an Asian Vine Snake taken from a kneeling position:...

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My favourite wildlife images are the ones that make me feel like I’m peering through a window, observing nature in a way that I shouldn’t be. They immerse me in the world of that animal and kick my imagination into overdrive. One technique I love to use for this is to add natural frames into my images, by which I mean including elements of the surrounding environment into the foreground of my shot. Natural frames can add depth, context and interest to your wildlife photography. They’re also useful for situations where getting closer to the animal isn’t possible, or if you...

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